Our submissions

(contribution to OHCHR study on 'work and employment of persons with disabilities', HRC 22nd session, March 2013)
 

>Shadow report on Paraguay
(contribution to CRPD 8th & 9th sessions, 17-28 Sept 2012; 15-19 April 2013)
 

>Supplementary shadow report on Paraguay (contribution to the CRPD 9th session, 15-19 April 2013) 
 

(contribution to a consultation with NGOs, Intergovernmental process on the strengthening of human rights treaty bodies, letter of 9 August 2012)
 
 
(contribution to the CRPD 9th session, 15-19 April 2013)
 
 
>Our submission for the CRPD Day of General Discussion on "Women and Girls with Disability", (17 April 2013) 
 
 
>Shadow report on El Salvador (contribution to the CRPD 9th
session, 15-19 April 2013)
 
 
>Shadow report on Austria (contribution to the CRPD 10th session, 2-13 September 2013)
 
 
>Shadow report on Azerbaijan (contribution to the CRPD 10th session, 2-13 September 2013)
 
 
>Shadow report on Costa Rica (contribution to the CRPD 10th session, 2-13 September 2013)
 
 
>Shadow report on Sweden (contribution to the CRPD 11th session, 31 March -11 April 2014)
 
 
(contribution to the CRPD 12th session 15 September -3 October 2014)
 
 
(contribution to the CRPD 12th session and pre-session working group 7-10 October 2014)
 
 
>Shadow report on Cook Islands ( contribution to the CRPD 12th session and pre-session working group 7-10 October 2014)
 
 
>Shadow report on Turkmenistan (contribution to the CRPD 12th session and pre-session working group 7-10 October 2014)
 
 

 
 
 

Newsroom

1. POLICY STATEMENTS
 
>Disability is part of the human condition, says UN Secretary-General at UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Disability and Development (23 September 2013)
 
>We Need to Bridge Gap Between Well-Meaning Commitments and Long Overdue Actions, Says UN Secretary-General in Message for the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (27 November 2012)
 
>More Work Needed to Build Inclusive, Accessible Societies, Says UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (New York, 19 November 2012)
 
 
2. RATIFICATIONS
 
>Congo, Guinea-Bissau and Guyana ratify the CRPD Convention (September 2014)
 
>Grenada ratifies the CRPD Convention (August 2014)
 
 >Angola and Burundi accede/ratify the CRPD Convention (May 2014)
 
>Palestine and Switzerland accede the CRPD Convention (April 2014)
 
>Andorra and Georgia ratify the CRPD Convention (March 2014)
 
>Côte d'Ivoire and Japan ratify the CRPD Convention (January 2014)
 
>Tuvalu accedes the CRPD Convention (December 2013)
 
>Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Venezuela and Zimbabwe accede/ratify the CRPD Convention (September 2013)
 
>Kuwait accedes the CRPD Convention (August 2013) 
 
>Singapore ratifies the CRPD Convention (July 2013)
 
>Norway and Palau ratify the CRPD Convention (June 2013)
 
>Iraq ratifies the CRPD Convention (March 2013)
 
>Albania and Barbados ratify the CRPD Convention (February 2013)

>Cambodia ratifies the CRPD Convention (December 2012)
 
>Dominica and Malta ratify the CRPD Convention (October 2012)

>Israel, Poland and Russia ratify the CRPD Convention (September 2012)
 
 
 3. CRPD AFFAIRS

>CRPD States Parties Reporting Status Update (October 2014)

>CRPD adopts General Comment 1 (on Art 12) and General Comment 2 (on Art 9) and Guidelines on interaction with DPO/NGOs. The CRPD also adopts new views on individual petitions (April 2014)

>CRPD Committee concludes its 9th session and schedules a meeting with States parties for September 2013 (19 April 2013)
 
>CRPD Committee concludes its 8th  session, and schedules day of general discussions on 'women and girls with disabilities' (28 September 2012)
 
>New 9 Members elected to the CRPD Committee (CSP, 9-12 September 2012)
 
 
4. CRPD CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
 
>CRPD adopts Concluding Observations on the initial reports of
>Belgium (September 2014)
>Denmark (September 2014)
>Ecuador (September 2014)
>Mexico (September 2014)
>New Zealand (September 2014)
>South Korea (September 2014)
>Azerbaijan (April 2014)
>Costa Rica (April 2014)
>Sweden (April 2014)
>Australia (September 2013)
>Austria (September 2013)
>El Salvador (September 2013)
>Paraguay (April 2013)
>Argentina (September 2012)
>China (September 2012)
>Hungary (September 2012) 
>Peru (April 2012),
>Spain (September 2011) and
>Tunisia (April 2011)
 

5. CRPD LIST OF ISSUES
 
>CRPD adopts the List of Issues on Cook Islands, Croatia, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Mongolia, Turkmenistan (September 2014) and on  Germany (April 2014), and schedules the constructive dialogue with these States for the upcoming 13th session (25 March-17 April 2015)

>CRPD schedules adoption of List of Issues on Brazil, Gabon, Kenya, Mauritius, Qatar, Ukraine for the upcoming 13th session and subsequent meeting of the pre- session working group (25 March-24 April 2015)
 
 
6. OTHER TREATY BODIES


 
7. UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW

 
 
8. OTHERS
 
>UN Special Rapporteur Rashida Manjoo: Report to the UN General Assembly on violence against women with disabilities (October 2012)

>OHCHR study on violence against women and girls, and disability (HRC, 20th session, June 2012)

>Millennium Development Goals: a disability-inclusive development agenda towards 2015 and beyond (Report of the UN Secretary-General to the 67th session of the UN General Assembly, October 2012) 
 
       

Regional projects/Latin America and the Caribbean

Go to other regions: >Africa and the Middle East             >Asia and the Pacific                >Eastern Europe and Central Asia                >Western Europe and North America
 
 
 
 Contents

 >Peru


 
 
 

 

Peru

READ:  

A. CRPD:




4. CRPD Concluding observations below (or download here) (adopted April 2012)



 







 

United Nations

CRPD/C/PER/CO/1


Convention on the Rights
of Persons with Disabilities

 

Distr.: General

9 May 2012

ADVANCE EDITED VERSION

 

Original: English





 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Seventh session

16-20 April 2012

               Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 35 of the Convention

                   Concluding observations of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

               Peru


1.                 The Committee considered the initial report of Peru at its 66th and 67th meetings, held on 17 April 2012, and adopted the following concluding observations at its 72nd meeting, held on 20 April 2012.

         I.    Introduction

2.                 The Committee expresses its appreciation to the State party for its initial report, which was prepared in accordance with the Committee’s reporting guidelines (CRPD/C/2/3), as well as for the written replies to the list of issues (CRPD/C/PER/Q/1/Add.1).

3.                 The Committee expresses its appreciation for the constructive dialogue held between the delegation and the members of the Committee. The Committee appreciates the presence of the high-ranking delegation, including the Vice Minister of Women and Vulnerable Populations, and the President of CONADIS (National Council for the Integration of Persons with Disability), the latter an expert with disabilities, among its honourable members.

4.                 The Committee commends the State party for having ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention in 2007.

        II.    Positive aspects

5.                 The Committee notes with satisfaction the efforts made by the State party to implement the Convention through the adoption of laws, policies, plans and programmes, including the following:

(a)  Adoption of Act No. 29392 in August 2009 defining offences and establishing penalties for breach of the General Act on Persons with Disabilities;

(b)   Adoption of the Plan on Equality of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities 2009-2018;

(c)   Adoption of a pilot programme on psychosocial integration of persons with disabilities in the region of Tumbes;

(d)   Draft bill on the rights of the persons with disabilities, submitted to the Congress in March 2011;

(e)   Adoption of the Law 29535 on sign language;

(f)    Increased level of expenditure on its programmes for persons with disabilities.

      III.    Principal areas of concern and recommendations

          A.     General principles and obligations (arts. 1 - 4)

6.                 The Committee is concerned at the absence of a coherent and comprehensive strategy to implement the social model that the Convention establishes, including affirmative actions, to achieve the de facto equality of persons with disabilities and the full realization of the rights enshrined in the Convention, at all levels, including in rural areas. The Committee is further concerned that the State party’s legislative framework for disability is not yet in full conformity with the Convention, inter alia:

(a)   Law 27050 on Persons with Disability provides a definition of disability based on a medical, rather than a social perspective and does not include references to the core principles contained in articles 2 and 3 of the Convention;

(b)   Absence of reference to denial of reasonable accommodation and discrimination by association as forms of disability-based discrimination;

(c)   Existence of discriminatory requirements to acquire Peruvian nationality that prohibits persons with intellectual and psychosocial disabilities to do so.

7.                 The Committee recommends that State party bring forward a far reaching strategy to implement all the rights enshrined in the Convention and speed up the review of its legislative framework to bring it in full conformity with all provisions of the Convention, including its core principles, and in particular:

(a)    Amend Law 27050 to include a comprehensive definition of a person with disability;

(b)    Define denial of reasonable accommodation and discrimination by association as forms of disability-based discrimination;

(c)    Amend the Act for Foreigners in order to eliminate the requirements that discriminate against persons with intellectual or psychosocial disabilities.

8.                 While recognizing positive developments, such as the creation of a Permanent Multi-Sectoral Commission and the establishment of the CONADIS (National Council for the Integration of Persons with Disability), the Committee regrets the lack of meaningful participation of persons with disabilities, in particular the involvement of children and women with disabilities, and their representative organizations in the design of the legislation, as well as in other policy and decision-making processes.

9.                 The Committee recommends that the State party take specific measures to ensure active participation of persons with disabilities, including children and women with disabilities, in planning, executing, and monitoring of public decision-making processes at all levels and in particular in the matters affecting them.

10.              While taking note with appreciation of the adoption of a number of provisions, such as the public budget acts which authorize local and regional governments to allocate 0.5 per cent of their budgets to the improvement or provision of accessibility features, the Committee is concerned at the lack of information regarding compliance of municipalities with those regulatory provisions.

11.              The Committee urges the State party to implement the provisions of the Convention in all its territory and to regularly assess compliance and impact of policies and programmes aimed at further equalizing opportunities for persons with disabilities, including at regional and local levels.

           B.     Specific rights (arts. 5-30)

                         Equality and non-discrimination (art. 5)

12.              The Committee is concerned that, albeit the existence of a large number of different ethnic groups in Peru, indigenous and minority persons with disabilities are not considered as being at high risk of suffering multiple discrimination and that no data on their number and situation exists. In this connection, the Committee expresses its concern at the situation of indigenous and minority persons with disabilities, in particular women and children with disabilities that live in rural areas, as well as persons with disabilities of African descent.

13.              The Committee urges the State party to improve its data gathering in order to have clear statistics on indigenous and minority persons with disabilities. The Committee recommends that the State party place emphasis on the development of policies and programmes on indigenous and minority persons with disabilities, in particular women and children with disabilities that live in rural areas, as well as persons of African descent, in order to address the multiple forms of discrimination that these persons may suffer.

                         Women with disabilities (art. 6)

14.              The Committee is concerned at the lack of measures directed towards women with disabilities in the Law 27050 and in the National Plan for Persons with Disabilities 2009-2018. The Committee wishes to remind the State party that women can be subjected to multiple forms of discrimination, as already noted by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in its last concluding observations (CEDAW/C/PER/CO/6). The Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilitiesfurther notes with concern that women with disabilities do not benefit from special protection in the National Plan against Violence towards Women 2009-2015.

15.              The Committee urges the State party to accelerate its efforts to eradicate and prevent discrimination against women and girls with disabilities, by incorporating gender and disability perspectives in all programmes, as well as by ensuring their full and equal participation in decision-making. The Committee urges the State party to amend its legislative framework to provide special protection to women and girls with disabilities, as well as to adopt effective measures to prevent and redress violence against women and girls with disabilities.

                         Children with disabilities (art. 7)

16.              While taking note that the Code on Children and Adolescents (Law 27337) recognizes certain rights of children with disabilities, the Committee is concerned at their de facto enjoyment of those rights. The Committee is concerned at the invisibility of children with disabilities, in particular indigenous children, in statistical data of the State party.

17.              The Committee recommends that the State party make special care and assistance to children with disabilities, in particular indigenous children, a matter of high priority, and invest to the maximum extent of available resources in the elimination of discrimination against them, as well as gather accurate data to monitor the upholding of their rights. The Committee further recommends that the State party take steps to prevent violence, abuse and extreme abandonment of children with disabilities.

                         Awareness-raising (art. 8)

18.              While taking note of some steps taken by the State party to raise awareness on the rights of persons with disabilities, such as the national radio broadcasts, the Committee remains concerned at the insufficiency of these measures and at the existence of private fundraising initiatives using negative stereotypes and charity based approach (such as the Peruvian Telethon). The Committee draws the attention of the State party to the fact that far from promoting rights and empowering persons with disabilities, these campaigns perpetuate and reproduce stigma and, thus hinder the possibility of constructing a culture in which persons with disabilities are recognized as part of human diversity and society.

19.              The Committee calls upon the State party to take proactive measures to enhance awareness of the Convention and its Optional Protocol at all levels, to develop policies and programmes implemented to ensure elimination of stereotypes and to focus on the dignity, capabilities and contributions to society of persons with disabilities.

                         Accessibility (art. 9)

20.              The Committee regrets the lack of information on the level of implementation of the State’s requirement to have, by 2010, 60 per cent of public facilities accessible for persons with disabilities, as well as the absence of information on compliance with accessibility standards by private companies.

21.              The Committee urges the State party to speed up the plans and programmes directed to make public facilities, communications and public transportation, in the urban and rural areas, accessible for persons with disabilities and to ensure that private entities duly take into account all aspects of accessibility for persons with disabilities.

                         Equal recognition before the law (art. 12)

22.              The Committee is concerned at reports that a number of persons with disabilities, especially those living in rural areas and in long-term institutional settings, do not have identity cards and, sometimes, have no name.

23.              The Committee urges the State party to promptly initiate programmes in order to provide identity documents to persons with disabilities, including in rural areas and in long-term institutional settings, and to collect complete and accurate data on people with disabilities in institutions who are currently undocumented and/or do not enjoy their right to a name.

24.              The Committee notes with concern that legislation of the State party (article 7 of the Constitution and articles 564 and 565 the Civil Code) is not in conformity with article 12 of the Convention, as it establishes substitute decision-making instead of supported decision-making and permits the suspension of civil rights of persons with disabilities in cases of judicial interdiction. The Committee is also concerned at the lack of information concerning the number of persons who have been subjected to guardianship and trusteeship and the lack of legal remedies and safeguards, such as independent review and right to appeal, that are in place in order to revoke those decisions.

25.              The Committee recommends that the State party abolish the practice of judicial interdiction and review the laws allowing for guardianship and trusteeship to ensure their full conformity with article 12 of the Convention and take action to replace regimes of substitute decision-making by supported decision-making, which respects the person’s autonomy, will, and preferences.

26.              The Committee is concerned that the State party’s Civil Code denies the ability to exercise the right to marry to the “deaf-mute, blind-deaf and blind-mute persons, as well as to mentally handicapped persons and those suffering from mental deterioration”.  

27.              The Committee urges the State party to amend the Civil Code in order to adequately guarantee the exercise of civil rights, in particular the right to marry, to all persons with disabilities.

                         Liberty and security of the person (art. 14)

28.              The Committee notes with concern that article 11 of the General Health Law No. 26842 permits involuntary detention for people with "mental health problems”, defined to include people with psychosocial disabilities as well as persons with a “perceived disability” (persons with a drug or alcohol dependence).

29.              The Committee calls upon the State party to eliminate Law 29737 which modifies article 11 of the General Health Law, in order to prohibit the deprivation of liberty on the basis of disability, including psychosocial, intellectual or perceived disability.

                         Freedom from torture (art 15)

30.              The Committee is concerned at consistent reports of the use of continuous forcible medication, including neuroleptics, and poor material conditions in psychiatric institutions, such as the hospital Larco Herrera, where some persons have been institutionalized for more than ten years without appropriate rehabilitation services.

31.              The Committee urges the State party to promptly investigate the allegations of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, or punishment in psychiatric institutions, to thoroughly review the legality of the placement of patients in these institutions, as well as to establish voluntary mental health treatment services, in order to allow the persons with disabilities to be included in the community and release them from the institutions.

                         Right to live independently and be included in the community (article 19)

32.              The Committee is concerned at the absence of resources and services to guarantee the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and to be included in the community, in particular in rural areas.

33.              The Committee urges the State party to initiate comprehensive programmes to enable persons with disabilities to access a whole range of in-home, residential and other community support services, including personal assistance necessary to support living and inclusion in the community, and to prevent isolation or segregation from the community, especially in rural areas.

                         Respect for home and the family (art. 23)

34.              The Committee is deeply concerned that, according to the technical Norm for Family Planning 536/2005 - MINSA from 26 July 2005, persons with “mental incompetence” can be sterilized without their free and informed consent, as a method of contraception.

35.              The Committee urges the State party to abolish administrative directives on forced sterilization of persons with disabilities.

                         Education (art. 24)

36.              While taking note with appreciation of a number of Ministerial Directives aimed at establishing the framework of an inclusive education system, the Committee is concerned at the existing gaps in the de facto implementation of these provisions, in particular at the illiteracy rate among the indigenous peoples and Afro-Peruvian communities, and the impact that this may have on the indigenous and minority children with disabilities.

37.              The Committee recommends that the State party allocate sufficient budget resources to achieve advances in the progress for an inclusive education system for children and adolescents with disabilities, and take appropriate measures to identify and reduce illiteracy among children with disabilities, especially indigenous and Afro-Peruvian children.

                         Right to health (art. 25)

38.              The Committee is concerned that, according to State party’s replies to the list of issues, no rehabilitation services exist for 81 per cent of the population with a disability, and only 1.42 per cent of persons with disabilities are covered by social security programmes. The Committee is also concerned at the lack of health services, in particular in rural areas, as well as numerous limitations to persons with disabilities imposed by the Supreme Decree 004-2007-SA on Comprehensive Health Insurance. It further regrets the lack of early detection programmes of deafness for children in order to minimize and prevent further disabilities.

39.              The Committee urges the State party to elaborate comprehensive health programmes in order to ensure that persons with disabilities are specifically targeted and have access to rehabilitation and health services in general. The Committee further recommends that the State party :

(a)     Review its legal framework in order to ensure that insurance companies and other private parties do not discriminate against persons with disabilities;

(b)     Apply budgetary resources and create skills among health personnel, in order to effectively comply with the right to health care of persons with disabilities, ensuring that hospitals and health centres are accessible to persons with disabilities;

(c)     Provide services of early identification of disabilities, in particular deafness, designed to minimize and prevent further disabilities, including among children.

                         Work and employment (art. 27)

40.              While taking note with appreciation of the State party’s efforts to increase the level of employment of persons with disabilities, in particular the Supreme Decree No. 027-2007-PCM which requires institutions within the public sector to have at least 3 per cent of the total workforce composed of workers with disabilities, the Committee remains concerned at the high rate of unemployment and underemployment of persons with disabilities that, according to the State party’s response to the list of issues, go up to nearly 60 per cent and 35.3 per cent respectively.  

41.              The Committee urges the State party to develop new policies that promote the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the labour market which could include tax incentives for companies and persons who employ persons with disabilities, the recruitment of persons with disabilities in public administration and the development of self-employment programmes. The Committee further recommends that the State party adopt educational programmes to capacitate persons with disabilities in order to include them in the labour market.

42.              The Committee appreciates the State party’s concern with the widespread poverty of persons with disabilities.

43.              The Committee urges the State party to address the negative impact of poverty by mainstreaming disability inclusive socio-economic development.

                         Participation in political and public life (art. 29)

44.              The Committee commends the State party for issuing a resolution in October 2011 that nullified previous policies excluding persons with certain psychosocial and intellectual disabilities from the electoral rolls, as well as for updating the National Identity and Civil Status Registry (RENIEC) accordingly. However, the Committee remains concerned at:

(a)   The fact that persons with disabilities, who have been judicially interdicted, remain ineligible to vote and that the names of those excluded from the national voter registry have not yet been fully restored;

(b)   The lack of information on measures taken in order to inform the persons with disabilities on the above-mentioned developments and prevent such violations from happening in the future;

(c)   Numerous cases of persons in institutions who have not been able to exercise their right to vote because they lack identity documents or because of the interdiction to leave the institution, absence of special assistance or the distance from the polling station.

45.              The Committee recommends that the State party

(a)   Restore voting rights to all people with disabilities who are excluded from the national voter registry, including people with disabilities subject to judicial interdiction;

(b)   Reach out to vulnerable individuals and protect people with disabilities from such violations in the future, including through relevant training.

(c)   Guarantee the right to vote of people with disabilities in institutions, by ensuring that they are physically permitted to go to assigned polling stations and have the support required to do so, or to permit alternative options.

          C.     Specific obligations (arts. 31-33)

                         Statistics and data collection (art. 31)

46.              The Committee regrets the low level of disaggregated data on persons with disabilities. The Committee recalls that such information is indispensable to: understanding the situations of specific groups of persons with disabilities in the State party who may be subject to varying degrees of exclusion, especially indigenous people, women and children with disabilities and persons who live in rural areas; developing laws, policies and programmes adapted to their situations; and assessing the implementation of the Convention.

47.              The Committee recommends that the State party systematize the collection, analysis and dissemination of data, disaggregated by sex, age and disability; enhance capacity-building in this regard; and develop gender-sensitive indicators to support legislative developments, policymaking and institutional strengthening for monitoring and reporting on progress made with regard to the implementation of the various provisions of the Convention, taking into consideration the changes from the medical to the social model.

                         National implementation and monitoring (art. 33)

48.              The Committee is concerned at the lack of clarity as to the functions and division of responsibilities of Multi-Sectoral Permanent Commission and CONADIS, as well as the fact that they are not compliant with the Paris Principles.

49.              The Committee recommends that the State party specifically designate a national monitoring mechanism that is in conformity with the Paris Principles, and ensure, as a matter of priority, the full participation in the monitoring process of persons with disabilities and their representative organizations.

                        

                         Follow-up to concluding observations and dissemination

50.              The Committee requests the State party to implement the recommendations of the Committee as contained in the present concluding observations. The Committee recommends that the State party transmit the concluding observations for consideration and action to members of the Government and Parliament, officials in the relevant Ministries, the Judiciary and members of relevant professional groups, such as education, medical and legal professionals, as well as to local authorities, the private sector, and the media, using modern social communication strategies.

51.              The Committee requests the State party to disseminate the present concluding observations widely, including to non-governmental organizations and representative organizations of persons with disabilities, as well as to persons with disabilities themselves and members of their families, in accessible formats.

52.              The Committee strongly encourages the State party to involve civil society organizations, in particular disabled persons’ organizations, in the preparation of its second periodic report.

53.              The Committee requests the State party to provide, within two years and in accordance with article 35, paragraph 2 of the Convention, written information on the steps undertaken to implement the recommendations contained in paragraphs 23, 29 and 35.

                         Technical cooperation

54.              The Committee recommends that the State party avail itself of technical cooperation from the member organizations of the Inter-Agency Support Group (IASG) for the Convention for the purpose of obtaining guidance and assistance on implementing the Convention and the present concluding observations.

                         Next report

55.              The Committee requests the State party to provide its next periodic report by April 2016.



                                                       


 
 
 

B. Other UN Treaty Bodies

1. The Committee against Torture  (CAT) shares the CRPD concerns at possible practices of ill-treatment against persons with disabilities in Peru (Briefing notes, November 2012) 
  



 


 
 
 

C. Universal Periodic Review (Peru)


1. UPR of Peru insists on the implementation gaps found by the CRPD Committee (Briefing notes,  November 2012)
 


 
3. UPR Peru Voluntary Commitments  (20 February 2013)
 
 



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Argentina

READ:

A. CRPD
 
 
 
2. CRPD List of Issues (adopted April 2012)
 
 

 

4. CRPD Concluding observations below or download here (adopted September 2012)
 
 


 

United Nations

CRPD/C/ARG/CO/1


Convention on the Rights
of Persons with Disabilities

 

Distr.: General

8 October 2012

English

Original: Spanish









Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Concluding observations on the initial report of Argentina as approved by the Committee at its eighth session 

(17–28 September 2012)


1.   The Committee considered the initial report of Argentina (CRPD/C/ARG/1) at its 79th and 80th meetings, held on 19 and 20 September 2012, and adopted the following concluding observations at its 91st meeting, held on 27 September 2012.

         I.    Introduction

2.   The Committee wishes to express its appreciation to the State party for its initial report, which was prepared in accordance with the Committee’s reporting guidelines (CRPD/C/2/3), and for its written replies to the list of issues (CRPD/C/ARG/Q/1/Add.1).

3.   The Committee also expresses its appreciation for the constructive dialogue held between the delegation and the members of the Committee and for the presence of the delegation from the State party.

        II.    Positive aspects

4.   The Committee takes note with satisfaction of the efforts made by the State party to implement the Convention through the adoption of laws, plans and programmes, including the following:

      (a)           Adoption of Act No. 26571 (2009) on the democratization of political representation, transparency and electoral equity;

      (b)           Adoption of Act No. 26522 (2009) on audiovisual communication services;

      (c)           Creation of the Disabilities and Occupational Integration Unit, which is attached to the Supreme Court (December 2010), and a national programme for the assistance of persons with disabilities in their dealings with the bodies responsible for the administration of justice (Decree No. 1375/2011);

      (d)           Establishment of the Health and Disabilities Technology Centre.

      III.    Principal areas of concern and recommendations

          A.     General principles and obligations (arts. 1–4)

5.   The Committee notes with concern that, despite the steps taken to align the domestic legal system with the Convention, the former continues to exhibit major inconsistencies with the principles and requirements of the Convention, especially as regards equal recognition of persons with disabilities before the law. It also notes with concern that, because not all of the State party’s provincial legislation is aligned with the Convention, disparities arise in the approach taken at the local level to the rights of persons with disabilities and to the effective exercise of those rights.

6.   The Committee urges the State party to take the necessary steps to bring all its federal, provincial and local legislation into line with the Convention and to ensure the effective participation of organizations representing persons with disabilities in this process in accordance with article 4, paragraph 3, of the Convention.

7.   The Committee is concerned at the absence of a coherent, overall strategy for the implementation of the human rights model established in the Convention that provides for affirmative action measures to achieve de facto and de jure equality for persons with disabilities and for giving full effect, at all levels, to the principles and requirements set out in the Convention.

8.   The Committee urges the State party to pursue a broad and comprehensive strategy to realize all the rights set out in the Convention, taking due account of the human rights model of disability. The Committee also recommends that the State party take effective steps to ensure that persons with disabilities — including children and women with disabilities — are actively involved in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating this strategy.

9.   The Committee acknowledges the progress represented by the introduction of the Single Disability Certificate. However, it notes with concern that the certificate has not yet been rolled out nationwide and that there are disparities in the criteria used for its issuance. The Committee is also concerned that some provinces are not yet in compliance with Act No. 24.901 on basic services for persons with disabilities.

10.                The Committee urges the State party to take steps to guarantee the effective implementation of the Single Disability Certificate throughout the country and to standardize the criteria used by the National Rehabilitation Service and the provincial evaluation boards for its issuance. It also urges the State party to ensure that all provinces are in compliance with Act. No. 24.901.

           B.     Specific rights (arts. 5–30)

                         Equality and non-discrimination (art. 5)

11.                The Committee notes with concern that neither the concept of reasonable accommodation nor recognition that the denial of such accommodation is a form of discrimination are explicitly included in anti-discrimination laws or in the laws on, among other things, employment, health and education. It also wishes to express its concern at the lack of simplified judicial and administrative remedies that would allow persons with disabilities to report cases of discrimination on grounds of disability. The Committee is concerned at the lack of information on measures and actions designed to address the specific situations of persons with disabilities who belong to indigenous peoples and of deaf-blind persons.

12.                The Committee urges the State party to incorporate the concept of reasonable accommodation into its anti-discrimination legislation and to ensure that the relevant laws and regulations define the denial of reasonable accommodation as a form of discrimination on grounds of disability. The Committee recommends that the State party take steps to simplify existing judicial and administrative remedies in order to enable persons with disabilities to report acts of discrimination to which they have been subjected. The Committee also recommends that the State party devote special attention to the development of policies and programmes for persons with disabilities who belong to indigenous peoples and for deaf-blind persons with a view to putting an end to the many forms of discrimination to which these persons may be subjected.

                         Women with disabilities (art. 6)

13.                The Committee takes note with concern of the unconvincing measures taken by the State party to address the specific needs of women and girls with disabilities, and it regrets the lack of proper protection for their rights (see CEDAW/C/ARG/CO/6, paras. 43 and 44). It is particularly concerned that there is no strategy for mainstreaming gender and disability issues into legislation and programmes focusing on women, including those that deal with violence, access to justice, sexual and reproductive rights, and access to the labour market.

14.                The Committee urges the State party to adopt a strategy for guaranteeing full protection and enjoyment of the rights of women and girls with disabilities, while also ensuring their effective participation in decision-making processes. In addition, the Committee recommends that the State party incorporate a disability perspective into all gender-equality policies and programmes, thereby guaranteeing the full and effective participation of women with disabilities on the same footing as other women.

                         Children with disabilities (art. 7)

15.                The Committee notes with concern that Act No. 26.061 on the comprehensive protection of the rights of children and adolescents contains no provisions specifically on children with disabilities. It is also concerned at the lack of information on the situation of children with disabilities in the State party.

16.                The Committee recommends that the State party should, as a priority, incorporate a disability perspective into Act No. 26.061 and the system for the comprehensive protection of children’s and adolescents’ rights. The Committee urges the State party to invest the greatest possible amount of available resources in ending discrimination against children with disabilities and to ensure that they are covered by health insurance schemes and receive the services and benefits, such as pensions and housing, to which they are entitled.

                         Accessibility (art. 9)

17.                The Committee takes note of the State party’s current legislation on accessibility for persons with disabilities. However, it notes with concern that, despite the establishment of the Advisory and Monitoring Committee, the State party does not have effective mechanisms for overseeing and evaluating compliance with accessibility legislation in all the areas covered by the Convention or for regulating and monitoring the imposition of sanctions for non-compliance. The Committee is also concerned about the challenge posed by the State party’s federal structure in terms of the achievement of full accessibility for all persons with disabilities in every province and municipality in its territory.

18.                The Committee recommends that the State party establish effective mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating compliance with accessibility laws in the State party and that it take the necessary measures to facilitate the alignment of the relevant federal and provincial legislation with the Convention and the development and implementation of accessibility plans. The Committee also urges the State party to ensure that private entities take due account of all aspects of accessibility for persons with disabilities.

                         Equal recognition before the law (art. 12)

19.                The Committee is deeply concerned about the inconsistencies observed in both the laws already in force and bills that are now being considered in the State party which are based, or continue to be based, on a substitute decision-making model that overrides the wishes of the persons concerned, which clearly runs counter to article 12 of the Convention. The Committee is also concerned at the reluctance of some justice officials to apply the rules that set limits on a court’s discretion in restricting the legal capacity of persons with disabilities.

20.                The Committee urges the State party to launch an immediate review of all current legislation that is based on a substitute decision-making model that deprives persons with disabilities of their legal capacity. At the same time, the Committee urges the State party to take steps to adopt laws and policies that replace the substitute decision-making system with a supported decision-making model that upholds the autonomy, wishes and preferences of the persons concerned. In addition, the Committee recommends that training workshops on the human rights model of disability be organized for judges to encourage them to adopt the supported decision-making system instead of granting guardianships or trusteeships.

21.                The Committee expresses concern at the inconsistencies existing between the proposal for the amendment and standardization of the Civil and Commercial Code and the Convention, as the concept of judicial prohibition would be retained and judges would have complete discretion to appoint a trustee or decide on what decision-making support tools are needed by persons with disabilities.

22.                The Committee urges the State party to ensure that the concept of judicial prohibition does not figure in the proposal for the amendment and standardization of the Civil and Commercial Code and to guarantee the effective participation in the review process of organizations representing persons with disabilities.

                         Liberty and security of the person (art. 14)

23.                The Committee notes with concern that involuntary long-term committal is still common in the State party, despite the fact that deinstitutionalization strategies have been adopted and the National Mental Health Act (Act No. 26.657) is based on the human rights model of disability.

24.                The Committee urges the State party to implement the deinstitutionalization strategies that it has adopted in an effective manner and to develop and implement mental health plans based on the human rights model of disability, along with effective measures to promote the deinstitutionalization of persons with disabilities.

25.                The Committee is concerned that, when a person with a psychosocial or intellectual disability is declared to be exempt from criminal responsibility in criminal proceedings, due process guarantees are not upheld and the person is immediately deprived of his or her liberty without even having been shown to be linked to the event in question.

26.                The Committee requests the State party to modify its federal and provincial criminal laws so that decisions regarding the application of security measures to persons found to be exempt from criminal responsibility are taken only after due process guarantees concerning the right to a defence and the right to the assistance of a lawyer, including any adjustments in the proceedings that may be necessary in order to guarantee the exercise of such rights, have been upheld.

                         Freedom from torture (art. 15)

27.                The Committee notes with concern that Senate approval of the bill that would create a national mechanism for the prevention of torture has been delayed.

28.                The Committee urges the State party to immediately approve the bill on the creation of a national mechanism for the prevention of torture so that institutionalized persons with disabilities can be monitored and protected from actions that may constitute acts of torture or other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

                         Freedom from exploitation, violence and abuse (art. 16)

29.                The Committee notes with concern that neither Act No. 26.485 on comprehensive protection and the prevention, punishment and elimination of violence against women nor Act No. 26.061 on the comprehensive protection of the rights of children and adolescents takes account of the specific situation of women with disabilities and children with disabilities, respectively. The Committee is also concerned about the lack of protection against violence and abuse for institutionalized persons with disabilities.

30.                The Committee urges the State party to guarantee protection for women with disabilities and children with disabilities in, respectively, the revised versions of Act No. 26.485 and Act. No. 26.061 and their implementing regulations. It also urges the State party to incorporate a disability perspective into policies and programmes developed on the basis of these acts. In addition, it recommends that the State party draw up appropriate guidelines for the prevention of violence against persons with disabilities who are institutionalized. The Committee also recommends that the State party collect data and information on violence and abuse against persons with disabilities, paying particular attention to women, children and persons who are institutionalized. To that end, the State party should, inter alia, establish institutional mechanisms for the early detection of situations in which violence may occur, diligently investigate allegations of violent acts and make any adjustments in procedures that may be needed so that victims can testify and those responsible can be prosecuted.

                         Protecting the integrity of the person (art. 17)

31.                The Committee regrets that, in cases where a woman with disabilities is under guardianship, her legal representative may give consent for a legal abortion on her behalf. It is likewise concerned that persons with disabilities are being sterilized without their free and informed consent.

32.                The Committee recommends that the State party amend article 86 of its Criminal Code and article 3 of Contraceptive Surgery Act No. 26.130 so that they will be in accordance with the Convention and take steps to provide the necessary support to women under guardianship or trusteeship to ensure that the women themselves are the ones who give their informed consent for a legal abortion or for sterilization.

                         Living independently (art. 19)

33.                The Committee regrets that the State party’s Support Service for Independent Living (SAVA) is not yet operational, and it is concerned that the available resources and services are of insufficient quality and quantity to guarantee the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and to be included in the community.

34.                The Committee urges the State party to ensure that the Support Service for Independent Living (SAVA) becomes operational as soon as possible and to develop and implement comprehensive programmes that will enable persons with disabilities to have access to a wide range of in-home, residential, community-based and other rehabilitation services and to freely choose where and how to live.

                         Respect for home and the family (art. 23)

35.                The Committee notes with concern that the right to form a family is denied to some persons with disabilities, especially those declared “insane” or “lacking legal capacity”, in accordance with article 309 of the State party’s Civil Code.

36.                The Committee urges the State party to amend the Civil Code to bring it into line with article 12 and article 23, paragraph 1 (b), of the Convention and to make support services to assist with the demands of parenthood available to persons with disabilities who require them.

                         Education (art. 24)

37.                The Committee notes that the legal framework regulating education in the State party expressly recognizes the principle of inclusive education (Act No. 26.206, art. 11). However, it is concerned that the implementation of this principle is limited, in practice, by a failure to tailor programmes and curricula to the needs of pupils with disabilities and by the prevalence of all sorts of barriers that prevent persons with disabilities from accessing the educational system without discrimination and on an equal footing with other students. The Committee is deeply concerned about the high number of children with disabilities who attend special schools and about the lack of educational resource centres that support the effective inclusion of students with disabilities.

38.                The Committee recommends that the State party develop a comprehensive State education policy that guarantees the right to inclusive education and allocates sufficient budgetary resources to ensure progress towards the establishment of an education system that includes students with disabilities. The Committee also urges the State party to intensify its efforts to ensure that all children with disabilities receive a full compulsory education as established by the State party, while devoting particular attention to indigenous peoples and other rural communities. It likewise urges the State party to take the necessary steps to ensure that pupils with disabilities who attend special schools are enrolled in inclusive schools and to offer reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities within the general education system.

                         Health (art. 25)

39.                The Committee is concerned about the systemic barriers that make it impossible for persons with disabilities to access health services in the State party. These include physical barriers, a dearth of accessible materials, a lack of health-care professionals trained in the human rights model of disability and restrictions on the exercise of legal capacity that exclude persons with disabilities from taking decisions concerning their own treatment.

40.                The Committee recommends that the State party develop comprehensive health-care programmes that specifically make provision for persons with disabilities and ensure that they have access to habilitation and rehabilitation health services. It urges the State party to allocate budgetary resources and provide training for health personnel in order to effectively realize the right to health of persons with disabilities, while also ensuring that hospitals and health centres are accessible to persons with disabilities.

41.                The Committee regrets that the effective implementation of the National Mental Health Act (Act No. 26.657) is under threat because its implementing regulations have not yet been adopted and because the make-up of its review body has yet to be agreed upon. It also regrets the lack of clear-cut mechanisms for ensuring that persons with disabilities give their free and informed consent for any type of medical treatment before it is administered.

42.                The Committee urges the State party to adopt the implementing regulations for the National Mental Health Act (Act No. 26.657) as soon as possible, to establish its review body, to strengthen the network of community mental health services and to improve coordination between these services and inclusive employment, education and housing mechanisms in order to guarantee the effective implementation of the National Mental Health Act. The Committee also recommends that the State party adopt protocols for ensuring that all persons with disabilities give their free and informed consent for any type of medical treatment before it is administered.

                         Work and employment (art. 27)

43.                The Committee takes note of the labour law that establishes a minimum quota of 4 per cent for the employment of persons with disabilities in the public sector (Act No. 25.689) and of the various employment programmes for persons with disabilities that have been developed within the public sector. However, the Committee notes with concern that there is a lack of the disaggregated data (by, inter alia, sex, age, type of disability and geographic location) needed to assess compliance with this quota at the national and provincial levels. The Committee is also concerned about the cultural barriers and prejudices that hinder persons with disabilities from entering the labour market, particularly in the private sector, despite the existence of tax incentives for employers. It is also disturbed about discrimination against women with disabilities in the realm of employment.

44.                The Committee urges the State party to develop a public policy to promote the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the labour market through, for example, the launch of awareness-raising campaigns targeting the private sector and the public at large which are designed to break down cultural barriers and prejudices against persons with disabilities, the implementation of reasonable adjustments in order to ensure that persons with disabilities in need of such adjustments can participate in the labour market, and the development of training and self-employment programmes. The Committee recommends that the State party reinforce its measures for monitoring and certifying compliance with the employment quota for persons with disabilities in the public sector. It also recommends that the State party undertake the systematic collection of disaggregated data as a basis for a proper assessment of compliance with the employment quota at the national and provincial levels.

                         Adequate standard of living and social protection (art. 28)

45.                The Committee notes with concern that provisions in the State party’s laws on non-contributory pensions (including the requirement set out in Regulatory Decree No. 432/97 and the eligibility requirement for a welfare pension based on the presence of a disability established in Act No. 18.910) discriminate, either directly or indirectly, against persons with disabilities. The Committee is also concerned about the unequal treatment of migrant workers with disabilities and disabled children of migrant workers in terms of access to social protection measures, such as disability pensions, health care, rehabilitation services and housing.

46.                The Committee urges the State party to review its social security legislation and to reformulate the provisions that prevent persons with disabilities, including migrant workers and disabled children of migrant workers, from having equal access to social protection in accordance with article 28 of the Convention.

                         Participation in political and public life (art. 29)

47.                The Committee would like to express its recognition of the fact that the State party has repealed the provisions in its Electoral Code that barred deaf-mute persons who do not know how to communicate in writing and persons with psychosocial or intellectual disabilities who have been interned in public institutions from exercising their right to vote. Nevertheless, the Committee remains concerned by:

      (a)           The fact that the amendments to the Electoral Code have not included the elimination of the provision whereby persons who have been declared legally incompetent by a court of law are barred from exercising their right to vote;

      (b)           The lack of appropriate measures for ensuring that institutionalized persons with disabilities have access to the polls and can leave the institutions in question in order to vote.

48.                The Committee recommends that the State party:

      (a)           Review the Electoral Code and introduce the necessary amendments to bring it into line with the standards set forth in the Convention, particularly with respect to legal capacity and the exercise of the right to vote on an equal basis;

      (b)           Pursue its efforts to ensure that institutionalized persons with disabilities have access to the polls by, for example, devising and implementing a national plan for ensuring that people are able to exercise their right to participation in political life (CRPD/C/ARG/Q/1/Add.1, para. 249) or other alternative solutions.

          C.     Specific obligations (arts. 31–33)

                         Statistics and data collection (art. 31)

49.                The Committee would like to express its recognition of the State party for the work it has begun in order to conduct the second national disability survey and to underscore the importance of compiling up-to-date data which will provide an accurate picture of the situation of specific groups of persons with disabilities who may be subject to multiple forms of exclusion, particularly women, children, institutionalized persons, those who have been deprived of legal capacity and those belonging to indigenous peoples.

50.                The Committee recommends that the State party systematize its collection, analysis and dissemination of statistics and data, taking into consideration the situation of specific groups of persons with disabilities who may be subject to multiple forms of exclusion. The Committee urges the State party to step up its capacity-building measures in this area and to develop indicators that will reflect issues of multiple discrimination and intersectionality as they relate to persons with disabilities, taking into consideration the changeover from a medical to a human rights model of disability.

                         National implementation and monitoring (art. 33)

51.                The Committee notes with concern that the National Advisory Commission on the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (CONADIS) is not of a sufficiently high institutional rank to effectively carry out its duties as a mechanism for facilitating and coordinating matters relating to the implementation of the Convention at all levels and in all sectors of government. The Committee also notes with concern that the National Disability Observatory, which is tasked with overseeing the implementation of the Convention, is a subsidiary body of CONADIS, in violation of article 33, paragraph 2, of the Convention and the Paris Principles.

52.                The Committee recommends that the State party raise the institutional rank of CONADIS and endow it with the human and financial resources it needs in order to effectively fulfil its mandate to coordinate the implementation of the Convention at all levels and in all sectors of government. The Committee urges the State party to designate an independent national oversight mechanism that is in full compliance with the Paris Principles and to provide guarantees, as a matter of priority, for the full participation of persons with disabilities and the organizations that represent them in the oversight process.

                         Follow-up to concluding observations and dissemination

53.                The Committee requests the State party to act upon the recommendations of the Committee as set forth in these concluding observations. The Committee recommends that the State party transmit the concluding observations for consideration and action to members of the Government and Congress, officials in the relevant ministries, the judiciary and members of relevant professional groups, such as education, medical and legal professionals, along with local authorities, the private sector and the media, using modern social communication strategies.

54.                The Committee requests the State party to disseminate these concluding observations widely in accessible formats, particularly to non-governmental organizations, organizations representing persons with disabilities, persons with disabilities themselves and members of their families.

55.                The Committee strongly encourages the State party to involve civil society organizations, in particular disabled persons’ organizations, in the preparation of its second periodic report.

                         Technical cooperation

56.                The Committee recommends that the State party avail itself of technical cooperation from the member organizations of the Inter-Agency Support Group for the Convention for the purpose of obtaining guidance and assistance in the implementation of the Convention and these concluding observations.

                         Next report

57.                The Committee requests the State party to submit its next periodic report in October 2014.

                                               









 
 
 
B. Universal Periodic Review (Argentina)

1. UPR of Argentina insists on implementation gaps found by the CRPD (Briefing notes, October 2012) 
 

 
3. UPR Argentina Voluntary Commitments (21 February 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Paraguay

 
 READ:
 
 
 
2. CRPD List of Issues (adopted September 2012)




4. Concluding Observations (adopted April 2013, (CRPD 9th session) Spanish text)
 
 >DisabCouncil's shadow report on Paraguay

 
 
 
  
 
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EL Salvador

 
 READ:
  
  
2. CRPD List of Issues (adopted, April 2013 (CRPD 9th session) Spanish text)
   
3. EL Salvador Reply to List of Issues (forthcoming)
 
 4. Forthcoming (CRPD constructive dialogue with El Salvador (CRPD 10th session, September 2013))
 
 
 
 



Costa Rica

READ:  

1. Costa Rica Initial report (Spanish text) (submitted March 2011) 

2. CRPD List of Issues (scheduled for adoption, September 2013)

3. Costa Rica Reply to List of Issues (forthcoming)

4. Forthcoming (CRPD constructive dialogue with Costa Rica (CRPD 11th session, April 2014)

 
 
 

 


 


Upcoming events

13th session of the CRPD Committee (25 March - 17 April 2015)
 
 
Adoption of Concluding Observations
 
I.Cook Islands
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
II.Croatia
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
2. Disability Ombudsman
 
 
III.Czech Republic
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
IV.Dominican Republic
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report  
2. OPDs 1, 2, 3
 
 
V. Germany
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report  
4. BRK-Allianz 12
 
 
VI. Mongolia
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
VII.Turkmenistan
List of Issues & Replies
Concluding observations (tba)*
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
  _____________
*(To be adopted at the session) 
 
 
======********=====  
 
Meeting of the CRPD Pre-session Working Group
         (20-24 April 2015)
 
 
    Adoption of Lists of Issues
 
VIII.Brazil
List of Issues(tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
IX.Gabon
List of Issues(tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report

  
X.Kenya
List of Issues (tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
XI.Mauritius
List of Issues(tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report

 
XII.Qatar
List of Issues(tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
XIII.Ukraine
List of Issues (tba)**
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
  ______________
**(To be adopted at the pre-session) 
 
  
  More information can be found on CRPD website by clicking here.
 
 
 
 
 

Recent events and developments


12th session of the CRPD Committee (15 September - 3 October 2014)
 
 
Adoption of Concluding Observations
 
I.Belgium
 
Contributions from civil society
1. GRIP  12, 3
2. Belgian disability forum 1, 2
4. Equal Opportunities 1, 2
 
 
II. Denmark
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DPOs 1, 2, 3
2.Danish human rights institute 1, 2
 
 
III.Ecuador
 
 
VI.Republic of Korea
*(To be adopted at the session) 
 
 
======********=====  
 
Meeting of the CRPD Pre-session Working Group
         (7-10  October 2014)
 
 
    Adoption of Lists of Issues
 
VII.Cook Islands
 
Contributions from civil society
1. Disabcouncil analytic report
 
 
VIII.Croatia
 
Contributions from civil society
 
 
IX.Czech Republic
 
Contributions from civil society
 
 
X.Dominican Republic
 
Contributions from civil society
1. OPDs 1, 2, 3
 
 
XI. Mongolia
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
 
XII.Turkmenistan
 
Contributions from civil society
1. DisabCouncil analytic report
 
  ______________
**(To be adopted at the pre-session) 
 
  
  More information can be found on CRPD website by clicking here.
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

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